Supporting migrants in entrepreneurship
Self-assessment

Create Migrant assessment

migrants_page_one
• Entrepreneurship is promoted as a viable activity for migrants.• A positive image of migrant entrepreneurs is created.• The economic impact of migrant entrepreneurship is communicated.• Success stories, role models and entrepreneurship awards are used to showcase migrant entrepreneurs from a wide variety of backgrounds, with a wide variety of types of businesses. Awareness campaigns should seek to develop positive attitudes towards entrepreneurship and stimulate entrepreneurial intentions. Once there is an overall awareness about entrepreneurship among a population, tailored campaigns should be designed for specific sub-groups. Key activities in awareness campaigns for inclusive entrepreneurship include disseminating positive messages in the media, organising outreach and awareness events, and using awards and success stories to celebrate successful entrepreneurs from various population groups. When promoting migrant entrepreneurship in society, it is important to highlight the contributions of migrant entrepreneurs and their role in building communities. Read more.
• Campaigns, success stories, role models and entrepreneurship awards are used to inspire migrants and showcase migrant entrepreneurs from a wide variety of backgrounds, with a wide variety of types of businesses.• Messages are tailored for different profiles of migrants. • Appropriate messages are used to inform about the role of risk in entrepreneurship.• Appropriate media and online channels are used to reach migrant communities. Target populations of inclusive entrepreneurship campaigns are heterogeneous so awareness campaigns should include tailored messages that are delivered through appropriate channels. Common approaches used include promoting success stories and role models, and using awards to inspire entrepreneurs by showcasing different profiles of entrepreneurs and different types of entrepreneurship activities. When delivering migrant entrepreneurship campaigns, it is important to partner with organisations that have direct contact with migrant communities, such as non-government organisations that work with migrants. Read more.
• Targeted campaigns inform community-based organisations, networks and business associations about entrepreneurship.• A positive image of migrant entrepreneurship is created.• Appropriate media and online channels are used to reach key role models for potential migrant entrepreneurs. Key role models have an important role in informing about entrepreneurship and encouraging (or discouraging) entrepreneurship activities. Policy makers therefore also need to reach them with information packages and positive messages. To support entrepreneurship for migrants, it is important to reach the key role models such as successful entrepreneurs from various migrant communities, parents and teachers. Read more.
• Entrepreneurship is presented positively in the mandatory curricula in schooling.• Entrepreneurship education covers a wide variety of entrepreneurship activities and models, e.g. part-time entrepreneurship, social entrepreneurship.• Teachers receive training on delivering the entrepreneurship curricula. • Migrant students are encouraged to consider entrepreneurship as a career path. Formal education presents an opportunity to promote entrepreneurship to a large number of youth and young adults. To be effective, teachers need training on entrepreneurship and also need to understand the potential that it can hold for different population groups. Moreover, teaching material should showcase a wide range of entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship activities, including migrant entrepreneurship. To have maximum impact on young people from migrant communities, it is important that entrepreneurship is promoted through both formal and informal education activities. Read more.
• Monitoring and mid-term evaluations are undertaken to ensure that promotional activities are on-track to reach their targets and objectives.• Promotional activities are adjusted to account for monitoring and mid-term evaluation results.• Ex post evaluations are undertaken to measure the impact of migrant entrepreneurship promotion activities and results are reported widely.• Monitoring and evaluation results are reported widely and used to improve awareness campaigns. Monitoring and evaluation are an important part of the policy development process. These activities are often contracted out to leverage specialised knowledge and to maintain the impression of impartiality. When evaluating the impact of awareness campaigns for migrant entrepreneurship, it is important to collect qualitative information through interviews with different migrant communities to complement metrics on business creation. Read more.
migrants_page_two
• A strategic plan is available publicly, either as a stand-alone document or as part of a broader policy strategy, e.g. self-employment strategy for migrant communities.• Entrepreneurship policy objectives are linked to broader employment, economic and social policy objectives. • Key migrant entrepreneurship stakeholders were engaged early in the development of policy objectives and targets.• Indicators of success and data collection processes have been defined.• A public sector actor is responsible for achieving migrant entrepreneurship policy objectives. Clearly defining policy objectives and targets can improve the implementation of policies and programmes, and help allocate resources. Often these are outlined in a written document such as a strategy or action plan. It is important that policy objectives and targets are informed by research and stakeholder views, and that they are realistic and achievable. In setting objectives and targets for migrant entrepreneurship support, it is important to consider the entrepreneurial potential of different profiles of migrants and set objectives and targets accordingly. Migrant entrepreneurship objectives should be developed in partnership with a range of relevant stakeholders (e.g. representatives from relevant migrant communities) and consistent with employment and integration objectives. Read more.
• Concrete actions to achieve the migrant entrepreneurship policy objectives are identified.• There is a clear leader in the public sector for entrepreneurship support targeted at migrants.• Responsibility for actions is identified.• Timelines for the concrete actions are identified. • An action plan is available publicly. An action plan can be an effective tool for transforming policy objectives into concrete policy actions on the ground. Action plans for inclusive entrepreneurship typically focus on one target group and identify the actions that will be taken to achieve the associated policy objectives. While one party should be responsible for the implementation of the action plan, responsibility for each action should be assigned to a ministry, department, agency, local authority, or other partner. In developing an action plan for migrant entrepreneurship support, it is important that policy makers secure support and engagement from organisations that work with migrant communities and other relevant stakeholders, notably migrant entrepreneurs. Read more.
• Sufficient financial resources have been earmarked to implement the strategy.• Funding sources have been identified.• A tracking system is in place to manage and report on public expenditures related to migrant entrepreneurship support.• There is an appropriate balance between investment in policy and programme development and operational expenditures.• There is budget for the monitoring and evaluation. Financial resources for tailored entrepreneurship policies are limited and should be a central consideration when selecting among policy options. It is important to consider all potential funding sources, including direct financing, matched financing for non-government actions, and the potential of leveraging in-kind support from the non-governmental sector. Effective financial management should include a tracking system that allows ongoing monitoring of expenditures. In securing financial resources for migrant entrepreneurship support, it is important to explore all potential funding sources e.g. European Social Fund, sponsorships from the private sector and civil society. There is also potential to leverage in-kind contributions from professional business development service providers and organisations that support migrant communities. Read more.
• Horizontal co-ordination mechanisms are in-place, e.g. inter-ministerial working group.• Vertical co-ordination mechanisms are in-place, e.g. working groups with policy makers and delivery agencies.• Information on migrant entrepreneurship schemes is shared regularly across public sector actors, and with other relevant stakeholders.• Data and statistics on the take-up and impact of migrant entrepreneurship schemes are shared regularly across public sector actors, and with other relevant stakeholders.• Informal communication is regular and ongoing between all relevant actors. The effective implementation of inclusive entrepreneurship policies and programmes requires co-ordination across the range of ministries, departments, agencies, local authorities, and non-government actors involved in designing and delivering support measures to ensure coherence and relevance and actions, and to minimise duplication. Mechanisms that could be used include working groups and committees with representation of all of the relevant actors. Success factors include strong leadership and regular communication. In establishing co-ordination mechanisms for the design and delivery of migrant entrepreneurship support, it is important for policy makers to strengthen relationships with migrant communities and organisations that work with migrant communities. It is also necessary to ensure that there are mechanisms for information sharing across all actors involved in delivering migrant entrepreneurship support. Read more.
For inclusive entrepreneurship initiatives to be successful, it is critical that the target groups are aware of the available support. Many people from groups that are under-represented or disadvantaged in entrepreneurship (e.g. women, youth, immigrants and the unemployed) are “hard to reach” and policy makers need to adjust their messages and communication methods to reach these populations. When reaching out to potential migrant entrepreneurs, it is important for policy makers to use online platforms and key role models (e.g. well-known entrepreneurs and leaders within the community). Messages should be tailored to different migrant populations (e.g. recent graduates, refugees) since they likely have different motivations and operate different types of businesses. Read more.
• Support providers have experience in working with migrants from different backgrounds and with diverse experiences and objectives.• Front line staff understands the unique challenges faced by different profiles of migrants, e.g. unfamiliar with regulations and culture, language challenges.• Front line staff receives communication training to effectively work with different profiles of migrants. Entrepreneurs from groups that are under-represented or disadvantaged in entrepreneurship (e.g. women, youth, immigrants, the unemployed) face greater and different barriers to business creation. This calls for support initiatives that are tailored to address the unique barriers faced. To be effective, those delivering support should understand these barriers and be trained to work with the target groups. To improve the delivery of entrepreneurship support for migrants, frontline staff should have appropriate entrepreneurship qualifications and experience, and strong communication skills. It is also helpful for the frontline staff to speak the same language as the targeted migrant communities. Read more.
• Ex ante evaluations are used to identify areas where policy action is needed, assess the consistency of proposed policy actions with ongoing interventions, identify linkages with other policy actions, and ensure that proposed actions are coherent with strategic objectives. • Monitoring and mid-term evaluations are undertaken to ensure that migrant entrepreneurship schemes are on-track to reach their targets and objectives.• Ex post evaluations are undertaken to measure the impact of migrant entrepreneurship policies and the results are reported publicly. • Results of monitoring and evaluation are reported publicly and fed back into the policy development process.• Schemes are adjusted to account for monitoring and evaluation results. Monitoring and evaluation are an important part of the policy development process. When assessing the impact of migrant entrepreneurship support against strategic objectives, policy makers must keep in mind that there can be a time-lag between the policy action and business creation. Supported migrants may not start a business immediately, but later on during their working life, depending on their particular needs, interests and circumstances. Read more
migrants_page_three
• The business registration process requires few procedures.• Regulations have been checked to ensure that migrant entrepreneurs are treated positively.• Electronic business registration and other business-related e-services exist.• Information on administrative procedures is available in clear language and accessible for different profiles of migrants.• Licensing and certification schemes do not impede migrant entrepreneurship.• People from migrant backgrounds can easily obtain individual assistance when dealing with administrative regulations and procedures, e.g. by telephone, in-person or online. Business start-up regulations and procedures can be a significant obstacle to business start-up for many entrepreneurs, especially those from under-represented and disadvantaged groups (e.g. women, youth, immigrants, the unemployed). These groups often have low levels of entrepreneurship skills and little experience with regulations and institutions related to business start-up. Policy makers have been simplifying processes and reducing capital requirements in recent years, but more can be done. To ensure that business start-up regulations and procedures do not pose undue difficulties for migrant entrepreneurs, policy makers should undertake a regulatory impact assessment in consultation with organisations that support migrant communities and other relevant stakeholders, including migrant entrepreneurs. Read more.
• Different profiles of migrant entrepreneurs have been considered in the development of information products (e.g. websites, brochures) on business creation.• Guidance material on business creation uses easily understood language and is relevant for the types of businesses that migrants operate.• Migrants can access information related to business creation through relevant channels, e.g. migrant community organisations, online platforms.• Stakeholders from migrant communities were consulted in the development of guidance material and help disseminate it. The provision of tailored information on business creation and self-employment can facilitate business creation by groups that are under-represented and disadvantaged in entrepreneurship (e.g. women, youth, immigrants, the unemployed) since it can address their specific needs. In developing tailored information for migrant entrepreneurs, it is important to use easy-to-understand and jargon-free language, and to offer key information sources in different languages. Information should be disseminated online and through key institutions such as community organisations and public libraries. Read more.
• Migrant entrepreneurs are eligible for coverage in all social security schemes, e.g. health insurance, pension schemes, maternity pay, unemployment insurance.• Welfare bridges and other similar measures are promoted directly to migrants to encourage business creation. • There are incentives for business creation to potential migrant entrepreneurs, e.g. temporary reductions in social security contributions, entrepreneur visa schemes.• Temporary incentives are phased-out rather than ending abruptly.• Migrant entrepreneurs can access social security benefits after a business exit. Social security systems can offer both incentives and disincentives for entrepreneurship. Migrant entrepreneurship can be encouraged by ensuring that migrant entrepreneurs can contribute to and benefit from core elements of social security. Policy makers can also use temporary measures such as reduced contributions to provide an incentive for business creation by migrants. Read more.
• Ex ante evaluations are used to identify areas where policy action is needed, assess the consistency of proposed policy actions with ongoing interventions, identify linkages with other policy actions, and ensure that proposed actions are coherent with strategic objectives. • Monitoring and mid-term evaluations are undertaken to ensure that regulatory measures that support migrant entrepreneurs are on-track to reach their targets and objectives.• Regulatory measures are adjusted to account for monitoring and mid-term evaluation results. • Ex post evaluations are undertaken to measure the impact of regulatory measures on migrant entrepreneurship and results are reported widely.• Results of monitoring and evaluation are reported publicly. Monitoring and evaluation are an important part of the policy development process. These activities are often contracted out to leverage specialised knowledge and to maintain the impression of impartiality. When evaluating the impact of regulations on migrant entrepreneurship, policy makers need to assess whether the types of businesses that migrants operate are disproportionately impacted by regulations. It is also important to examine how migrants are treated in the broader legal framework, e.g. banking regulations. Read more.
migrants_page_four
• Needs assessments are used in the design of policies and programmes that support the development of entrepreneurship skills for migrants.• Migrants and migrant community organisations are consulted to identify how policy can support the development of entrepreneurship skills. • The needs of different profiles of migrant entrepreneurs are considered when designing and implementing policies and programmes that develop entrepreneurship skills.• Background research is conducted to provide a solid evidence-base for policy interventions.• Benchmarking and meta-evaluations are used when designing initiatives that aim to develop entrepreneurship skills. A needs assessment should be completed in the initial stage of developing policies and programmes that seek to strengthen entrepreneurship skills. Key activities include gathering evidence on the challenges faced in entrepreneurship by people from under-represented and disadvantaged groups (e.g. women, youth, immigrants, the unemployed), reviewing the current support offer, and identifying gaps and areas for improvement. When designing training, coaching, mentoring and business development services for migrant entrepreneurs, a needs assessment should consider various profiles of migrants (e.g. recent graduates, refugees) and be developed in consultation with key stakeholders to understand gaps in the current support offer and areas for improvement. Read more.
• Dedicated entrepreneurship training is available for migrants.• Training covers the needs at different points of business development, i.e. pre start-up, start-up, growth, exit.• Risk management and financial literacy are included in training programmes.• Hands-on and interactive methods used in training, e.g. role playing, and simulations.• Trainers are trained to work with diverse profiles of migrants.• Entrepreneurship training for migrants has linkages with other entrepreneurship supports, e.g. coaching, mentoring and business financing programmes.• The scale of dedicated entrepreneurship training for migrants is appropriate. Entrepreneurship training programmes seek to facilitate the acquisition of business management and entrepreneurship skills. In designing and implementing entrepreneurship training programmes, policy makers need to consider the mode of delivery, themes covered, intensity and frequency of training sessions, and whether other supports should be provided with the training. It is important to adjust entrepreneurship training to the needs of different profiles of migrants (e.g. recent graduates, refugees) since they often operate different types of businesses. Training should use active learning methods (e.g. games, simulations) and it is usually most effective to deliver training programmes in partnership with organisations that have a history of working with migrants. Read more.
• Dedicated entrepreneurship coaching and mentoring programmes for migrants are available.• Objectives for coaching and mentoring relationships are defined by the entrepreneur and their coach and mentor.• There is a matching mechanism to ensure that there is a “good fit” between the entrepreneur and their coach or mentor.• Entrepreneurship coaches and mentors receive training on working with diverse profiles of migrants.• Coaching and mentoring relationships are established for a limited time period to avoid creating dependence.• The scale of tailored entrepreneurship coaching and mentoring for migrants is appropriate. Entrepreneurship coaching and mentoring can be an effective but resource-intensive support. The keys to a successful coaching or mentoring relationship are the quality and dedication of the coach or mentor, and ensuring a good match with the entrepreneurs. When designing and implementing entrepreneurship coaching and mentoring for migrants, it is important to build a pool of appropriate coaches and mentors who understand the challenges faced by migrant entrepreneurs and can deliver support in relevant languages. Read more.
• Tailored business consultancy and advisory services are available for migrant entrepreneurs from diverse backgrounds.• Business consultancy and advisory services are integrated with other entrepreneurship supports for migrants, e.g. start-up financing.• There is a system of allocating business consultancy and advisory services to migrant entrepreneurs with the greatest potential.• Business incubators and accelerators are accessible for migrants. • Business trainers and counsellors are trained to work with migrant communities.• The scale of tailored business development services for migrants is appropriate. Business development services can help entrepreneurs acquire new skills and expand their networks. Most public programmes offer support at no cost, but entrepreneurs also have the option of paying for private sector professional services. Business development services for migrants should be designed in integrated support packages that are delivered by trainers, coaches and business advisors that have experience working with migrant entrepreneurs. Supports should eventually attempt to refer migrant entrepreneurs to mainstream programmes. Read more.
· Tailored entrepreneurship support for migrants is offered in integrated packages.· People from migrant backgrounds are informed about the range of options for receiving financing and other supports.· Entrepreneurship training, coaching and mentoring initiatives refer migrant entrepreneurs to appropriate sources of finance. Integrated packages of entrepreneurship supports can be more effective than “single shot” supports since they usually address multiple barriers through a combination financial and non-financial supports. When designing and delivering integrated support packages, it is important to separate decisions related to financial support from the training, coaching or mentoring supports to ensure impartiality. Integrated entrepreneurship support programmes for migrants can be highly effective particularly where access to business finance is constrained, for example, for migrants who lack credit history. Read more.
• Entrepreneurship training, coaching and mentoring, and business development services for migrant entrepreneurs are delivered by agencies or organisations that have appropriate experience and expertise in working with migrant communities.• Support is provided in a flexible manner, including different formats, locations and schedules. The delivery of entrepreneurship training, coaching and mentoring, and business development services for migrants can be done either through mainstream channels or through approaches that are tailored for the targeted entrepreneurs. Tailored approaches are often more effective but are more costly. In delivering support to migrant entrepreneurs, policy makers should partner with specialist organisations that have experience in supporting and working with migrant communities. Read more.
• Entrepreneurship training, coaching and mentoring, and business development services are developed to meet the needs of different profiles of migrants, e.g. those whose first language is not the same as that in the host country, refugees, women.• Outreach methods are adapted to different profiles of migrants.• Different service delivery models are used to effectively support diverse profiles of migrants. Tailored entrepreneurship support programmes are typically more effective than generic measures because they are adapted to address specific needs, but they are more costly to develop and deliver. Migrant entrepreneurs are not all alike in terms of their motivations and types of businesses that they will start. Support initiatives should therefore be tailored, as much as possible, to the needs of a wide range of migrant entrepreneurs, e.g. recent graduates, refugees. Read more.
• Ex ante evaluations are used to identify areas where policy action is needed, assess the consistency of proposed policy actions with ongoing interventions, identify linkages with other policy actions, and ensure that proposed actions are coherent with strategic objectives. • Monitoring and mid-term evaluations are undertaken to ensure that migrant entrepreneurship schemes are on-track to reach their targets and objectives.• Schemes are adjusted to account for monitoring and mid-term evaluation results.• Ex post evaluations are undertaken to measure the impact of migrant entrepreneurship policies and the results are reported widely.• Deadweight loss and displacement effects are measured and reported.• Results of monitoring and evaluation are reported publicly and used to improve entrepreneurship training, coaching and mentoring and business development services.Monitoring and evaluation are important tools for managing public resources and understanding which initiatives have an impact and which do not. When assessing migrant entrepreneurship training, coaching and mentoring initiatives, and business development services, collect key performance metrics by gender, age and place of birth. Moreover, evaluations should account for deadweight loss and displacement effects. Also, it is important to recognise that entrepreneurship may not be suitable for all migrants. Read more.
migrants_page_five
• Needs assessments are used to design policies and programmes that facilitate access to start-up finance for migrants.• Migrants and migrant community organisations are consulted to identify how policy support can address gaps in the availability and accessibility of finance for migrant entrepreneurs.• The needs of different profiles of migrant entrepreneurs are considered when designing and implementing policies and programmes that facilitate access to start-up finance.• Background research is conducted to provide a solid evidence-base for policy interventions. • Benchmarking and meta-evaluations are used when designing finance measures. A needs assessment should be undertaken at the beginning of the policy development cycle. When assessing the gaps in the availability and accessibility of finance for entrepreneurs from under-represented and disadvantaged groups (e.g. women, youth, immigrants, the unemployed), policy makers need to conduct research, surveys and consultations to understand the financing needs and assess how the current finance support measures are meeting entrepreneurs’ needs. Assessing how policy can address the start-up financing needs for migrant entrepreneurs requires consideration of various profiles of migrants (e.g. language and cultural differences), as well as their motivations and types of business activities. It is important to consult with migrant entrepreneurs and representatives for the financial sector to identify and address gaps in the current suite of financing offers. Read more.
• A range of financial instruments is used to support migrants in business start-up, e.g. loan guarantees, microfinance, risk capital.• Different profiles of migrant entrepreneurs have access to start-up financing offers.• The private sector is involved in the selection of business ideas that receive financing.• Crowdfunding and peer-to-peer lending platforms for migrants are promoted and supported. • Only business ideas with a reasonable chance of success are supported.• Innovative business ideas (but not necessarily technology-related ideas) are favoured for support. • The scale of financing support offered is appropriate. Entrepreneurs from under-represented and disadvantaged groups (e.g. women, youth, immigrants, the unemployed) often face greater challenges in accessing start-up financing, often due to a lack of collateral and credit history. Therefore, it is common for policy makers to introduce tailored schemes to help entrepreneurs access loan guarantees, microfinance and a range of alternative instruments and markets. To facilitate access to start-up financing for migrant entrepreneurs, policy makers should ensure that financing initiatives match the needs of migrant entrepreneurs, including those who have difficulty accessing the formal banking system due to a lack of credit history. Read more.
• A range of financial instruments is available to support the development and growth of migrant-operated businesses, e.g. loan guarantees, microfinance, risk capital.• Different profiles of migrant entrepreneurs can access financing for business development and growth. • Lending laws and financial sector regulations ensure sufficient investor protection and transparency on business projects.• The private sector is involved in the design or management of financing mechanisms. • The scale of business development and growth financing support offered to diverse profiles of migrant entrepreneurs is appropriate. Business development and growth often require external financing to finance new equipment, staff and location. To support migrant entrepreneurs in accessing finance for business development and growth, policy makers should educate the target group on the available options and ensure that financing initiatives are suitable for different profiles of migrant entrepreneurs (e.g. recent graduates, refugees). Read more.
• Business angel networks dedicated to investing in migrant entrepreneurs are supported and encouraged, e.g. tax incentives, subsidised operating costs, public co-investment.• The private sector is involved in the design or management of financing mechanisms. • Training is offered to investors to teach them about the potential of migrant entrepreneurs, and to address potential biases in lending and investing decisions.• Training is offered to migrant entrepreneurs to improve investor readiness.• Public infrastructure to improve matchmaking between migrant entrepreneurs and investors exists. • The scale of support for risk capital measures and business angel networks is appropriate. High growth firms require large injections of capital to fuel the rapidly expanding business activities, often coming from business angel or venture capital investment. Very few entrepreneurs require this type of financing but it is possible for entrepreneurs from under-represented and disadvantaged groups (e.g. women, youth, immigrants, the unemployed) to need this type of investment. For migrant entrepreneurs who operate high-growth potential firms, policy makers should inform entrepreneurs about the advantaged and disadvantages of risk capital, and offer training on how to pitch business ideas to investors. Read more.
• Tailored entrepreneurship support for migrants is offered in integrated packages.• Migrant entrepreneurs receiving financial support are informed about the range of options for developing entrepreneurship, financial, and management skills.• There is an effective referral system to refer migrants supported through business financing initiatives to non-financial supports, e.g. training, coaching and mentoring.• Financing measures also refer migrant entrepreneurs to appropriate training, coaching and mentoring, business counselling. Business financing schemes that include entrepreneurship training, coaching or mentoring are often more effective because they help equip entrepreneurs with the skills needed to effectively use the financing received. When supporting migrant entrepreneurs with integrated support packages, policy makers should offer financial support incrementally and emphasise individual coaching, mentoring and business consultancy. Policy should also favour innovative ideas to minimise displacement effects. Read more.
• Business financing offers for migrant entrepreneurs are delivered by agencies or organisations have appropriate experience and expertise in working with migrant communities.• Support measures are accessible to migrant entrepreneurs.• A database of financing programmes and opportunities is available to migrant entrepreneurs. For business financing support to make an impact, it is important that it reaches the targeted entrepreneurs. Therefore, it is imperative that the financing is delivered through the most appropriate channels. In delivering business financing to migrant entrepreneurs, policy makers should ensure that migrant entrepreneurs can interact with initiatives through online platforms, including submitting applications for finance. It is also effective to partner with specialist organisations to conduct outreach and/or deliver the support. Read more.
• Ex ante evaluations are used to identify areas where policy action is needed, assess the consistency of proposed policy actions with ongoing interventions, identify linkages with other policy actions, and ensure that proposed actions are coherent with strategic objectives. • Monitoring and mid-term evaluations are undertaken to ensure that migrant entrepreneurship schemes are on-track to reach their targets and objectives.• Schemes are adjusted to account for monitoring and mid-term evaluation results.• Ex post evaluations are undertaken to measure the impact of migrant entrepreneurship policies and the results are reported widely.• Deadweight loss and displacement effects are measured and reported.• Results of monitoring and evaluation are reported publicly and used to improve start-up financing offers. Monitoring and evaluation are important tools for managing business financing schemes and understanding which initiatives have an impact and which do not. When assessing business financing schemes that support migrant entrepreneurs, it is important to assess the differential impact made by the financing initiative. This should include the impact of non-financial support, and account for deadweight loss and displacement effects. Read more.
migrants_page_six
• Needs assessments are used to design policies and programmes that support the development of entrepreneurship networks for migrants.• Migrants and migrant community organisations are consulted to identify how policy support can address gaps in migrant entrepreneur networks.• The needs of different profiles of migrants are considered when designing and implementing policies and programmes that build entrepreneurship networks.• Background research is conducted to provide a solid evidence-base for policy interventions.• Benchmarking and meta-evaluations are used when designing networking initiatives for migrant entrepreneurs. A needs assessment should be undertaken at the beginning of the development of any inclusive entrepreneurship networking initiative. When assessing the gaps in the availability and accessibility of entrepreneurship networks for entrepreneurs from under-represented and disadvantaged groups (e.g. women, youth, immigrants, the unemployed), policy makers need to conduct research, surveys and consultations to understand how current networks are meeting entrepreneurs’ needs. In assessing how public policy can address the networking needs of migrant entrepreneurs, policy makers will need to consult with migrant entrepreneurs to understand their needs and map them against current entrepreneurship networking initiatives. Read more.
• There is awareness about migrant entrepreneurship among mainstream business networks.• There are public initiatives that link migrant entrepreneurs with relevant mainstream business networks, organisations and associations to expand their networks.• Referrals to networks consider the needs, objectives and profile of migrants from diverse backgrounds. Different profiles of entrepreneurs will likely operate different types of businesses, and will have different motivations and aspirations. These will all shape the role that entrepreneurship networks have in supporting their business. In supporting the development of migrant entrepreneurship networks, it is important to use both physical and online platforms that connect migrant entrepreneurs with each other and other entrepreneurs. Read more.
• Publicly-supported migrant entrepreneurship networks raise awareness about available entrepreneurship supports.• Networks members are referred to a wide range of entrepreneurship support services. Entrepreneurship networks can help individual entrepreneurs access a range of resources, including identifying professional business supports. To effectively connect entrepreneurs from under-represented and disadvantaged groups (e.g. women, youth, immigrants, the unemployed) with entrepreneurship support organisations through entrepreneurship networks, policy makers need to ensure that partnerships are built with support organisations. To improve the use of networking initiatives to refer migrant entrepreneurs to professional support services, it is necessary for policy makers to identify relevant support providers, especially those that offer support in multiple languages. Read more.
• A person is responsible for engaging network members.• Network members feel a sense of ownership over the network and actively contribute to network activities.• There are regular opportunities for face-to-face and online interactions.• Newsletters are used to maintain regular contact with network members. To ensure that network members can maximise the benefits of being in the entrepreneurship network, active participation is needed. To ensure that migrants are engaged in entrepreneurship networks, it is important to organise regular opportunities to meet and interact with other entrepreneurs and business development professionals. Networks should be animated in relevant languages. Read more.
• Online platforms are used to expand the reach of the migrant entrepreneurship networks.• Online platforms and communities connect experienced migrant entrepreneurs with potential entrepreneurs from similar backgrounds. • Appropriate matching mechanisms are used to connect migrant entrepreneurs with more experience entrepreneurs.• Use of online networking platforms is monitored to verify take-up among migrants. Online platforms allow entrepreneurship networks to have a greater reach than networks that rely on face-to-face interactions. They also offer greater flexibility for how members engage with each other. However, there is a danger that this flexibility will lead to a lower level of commitment to the network and therefore less engagement. To be effective, online networks need strong management and regular outreach to keep members engaged. It is also important to seek more active engagement through occasional face-to-face events. Read more.
• Ex ante evaluations are used to identify areas where policy action is needed, assess the consistency of proposed policy actions with ongoing interventions, identify linkages with other policy actions, and ensure that proposed actions are coherent with strategic objectives. • Monitoring and mid-term evaluations are undertaken to ensure that migrant entrepreneurship schemes are on-track to reach their targets and objectives.• Schemes are adjusted to account for monitoring and mid-term evaluation results.• Ex post evaluations are undertaken to measure the impact of migrant entrepreneurship policies and the results are reported widely.• Results of monitoring and evaluation are reported publicly and use to improve networking initiatives.

Vertical Tabs

Group settings
Optionally select the group to attach this node to.
By selecting a group, the node will inherit the group's access control.